Waterfront Initiative

Where do your candidates stand on Waterfront issues?

What’s your long-term vision for Vancouver’s waterfront?

A thriving balance between the sometimes competing interests of transportation, housing, industry, and ecological protection.

Our waterfront has many competing pressures and conflicting interests. If elected, what would you prioritize and what would be your first action to address that idea?

As the GSA’s State of the Waterfront report stated, there is a public interest in increasing access to our waterfront and nature by increasing the number of people living within walking distance to a shoreline. The West End is an excellent example of a neighbourhood that has a vibrant mix of demographics and income that provides such access to nature. It is also under threat of gentrification. To ease these pressures, we should plan to immediately but gently densify currently-low-population areas such as West Point Grey, which is both predominantly single-detached houses yet provides excellent access to the waterfront. Because the income level of current residents in West Point Grey is so high, there is the least risk of gentrification. Also, there is least risk of displacement. Any development however must take into account stormwater runoff risks, ocean acidification from use of concrete, erosion due to excavation, etc. Creating more “West Ends”, with current best practices and standards in environmental protection, would be my first priority and action. The public revenues resulting from housing development could be used to support better wastewater management facilities, which are currently insufficient and contribute to our waters being unsafe for public access in some seasons. The federal marine disposal site off of Point Grey may need to be re-assessed as well, though we would need to pressure the federal government to first come to the table.

How would you build on the May 2017 Waterfront Motion to ensure the strongest possible waterfront planning for Vancouver’s future?

I would build on the Waterfront Motion by adopting NYC’s Vision 2020 model: a participatory 1-year planning process that encourages access to the shoreline and revived marine habitats, while supporting maritime industries and waterway transportation. There should be a continued emphasis here in Vancouver on participatory planning with a strong TSM First Nations presence, as is the case with the Jericho lands. Protecting wild salmon, rockfish, and orca populations will be a particular concern and emphasis for us.

If elected, would you help support a comprehensive waterfront plan?

Yes, I would support a comprehensive waterfront plan that came from a participatory planning process.

What’s your long-term vision for Vancouver’s waterfront?

No beach closures due to e-coli contamination, more restoration of natural habitats, good public access, more education about ecology and traditional indigenous uses.

Our waterfront has many competing pressures and conflicting interests. If elected, what would you prioritize and what would be your first action to address that idea?

Public interest comes first. Priorities are: continue city efforts to stop the expansion of the Kinder Morgan (now Canadian Government) pipeline, protect CRAB park from Port expansion, ensure a riverfront park in Marpole, and work with the federal government to achieve swimmable beaches (which would be my first action).

How would you build on the May 2017 Waterfront Motion to ensure the strongest possible waterfront planning for Vancouver’s future?

Request a quicker report back from staff on the opportunities for water quality improvement in the False Creek basin, followed by quick action on the recommendations. Resurfacing streams, separating sewers and moving quickly on my motion for green roofs (to reduce storm sewer runoff) are priorities.

If elected, would you help support a comprehensive waterfront plan?

Absolutely.

What’s your long-term vision for Vancouver’s waterfront?

A working, clean and healthy waterfront with abundant public access for recreation.

Our waterfront has many competing pressures and conflicting interests. If elected, what would you prioritize and what would be your first action to address that idea?

Our first priority would be to ensure a clean environment, while acknowledging that Vancouver is an active port and working to protect shrinking working-lands, alongside protecting privatization of existing public and recreational waterfront space. It matters deeply to us that future generations of Vancouverites, at all income levels, can play and work along a healthy waterfront. It also matters to us that this waterfront work be done within a commitment to reconciliation, ensuring that local First Nations whose land we live on play a central role in decision making.

How would you build on the May 2017 Waterfront Motion to ensure the strongest possible waterfront planning for Vancouver’s future?

The May 2017 Waterfront Motion is a great start. We would support the quick-start initiatives to make Trout Lake and False Creek swimmable ASAP, and would support the ongoing development of a comprehensive waterfront plan, in collaboration with stakeholders, in particular with local First Nations and urban Indigenous communities.

If elected, would you help support a comprehensive waterfront plan?

Yes.

What’s your long-term vision for Vancouver’s waterfront?

Over time, phasing out fossil fuel infrastructure (coal ports, LNG & oil storage tanks & pipelines) in order to revitalize natural ecosystems and give species a fighting chance at survival.

Our waterfront has many competing pressures and conflicting interests. If elected, what would you prioritize and what would be your first action to address that idea?

Prioritize life-sustaining ecosystems, followed by using waterfront land to house and support healthy human communities. First action would be to consult with experts to identify vulnerable ecosystems and enact measures to protect them.

How would you build on the May 2017 Waterfront Motion to ensure the strongest possible waterfront planning for Vancouver’s future?

As a teacher, I am very familiar with communication and collaboration across a variety of stakeholder perspectives. I would bring these skills into play as we work together to develop a comprehensive, city-wide, waterfront plan.

If elected, would you help support a comprehensive waterfront plan?

Yes. See answer above.

What’s your long-term vision for Vancouver’s waterfront?

Cleaner False Creek Sewage Situation Would Be Nice. It’s a vague question.

Our waterfront has many competing pressures and conflicting interests. If elected, what would you prioritize and what would be your first action to address that idea?

A lot of the Waterfront is under Federal and Park Board Control, Influence. I’d like to see better sewage treatment and desalinization, with private contractors or competitive business. See if innovators can get tide and current power working with minimal space, separate of the BC Power Monopoly.

How would you build on the May 2017 Waterfront Motion to ensure the strongest possible waterfront planning for Vancouver’s future?

Motions in city hall are useless bluster by bored politicians who want to look like they are doing something worth their overly high pay.

If elected, would you help support a comprehensive waterfront plan?

That depends on cost and plan. I promise to have an open and completely uncensored debate on it in council if people want to defend and push plans.

What’s your long-term vision for Vancouver’s waterfront?

Ensuring that the needs of our growing city for things like housing, employment, and transportation options are balanced with the delicate ecosystem with which we share the region.

Our waterfront has many competing pressures and conflicting interests. If elected, what would you prioritize and what would be your first action to address that idea?

The number one thing along the waterfront areas is to ensure that the ecosystem and environmental concerns are taken care of. While housing, transportation, and employment are incredibly important, none of these things can be prioritized without a healthy environment. The first action to address this really lies with ensuring that the proper studies are done and the right experts are consulted.

How would you build on the May 2017 Waterfront Motion to ensure the strongest possible waterfront planning for Vancouver’s future?

One of the major points addressed in this motion was restoring Traditional First Nation’s Food Sources. Given the importance of the waterfront to the First Nation’s, I believe we need to ensure the other portions of the motion, namely ‘A Thriving Working Waterfront’ and ‘Safe, Accessible Waterfront Recreation’, are undertaken in a way that adheres to true consultation with members of that community.

If elected, would you help support a comprehensive waterfront plan?

Yes, absolutely. I believe we’ve seen success in this area in fantastic cities like Copenhagen and New York and I believe Vancouver can have a plan that balances all of the aforementioned commitments.

What’s your long-term vision for Vancouver’s waterfront?

Ongoing restoration of the seawall. Greenspace attached to any approved developments, work with city council, Provincial or NGO’s, community groups, marina associations & strata’s to develop a strategy to restore and keep clean, maintain and grow our coastal marine flora and fuana. Protect existing waterfront not already permitted from further new development. Develop a clean water strategy to clean up marina’s from the debris, sludge and pollution that builds up and trapped around the dock of marina’s and pollutes the water, killing marine life. Work with city, feds, First nations to develop a long term strategy on the size and number of ships in Vancouver harbours at one time and distance from shore. Press City council to expedite the separation of sewer and storm lines to reduce sewer run off going into local waterways and eliminate sooner than 2050.

Our waterfront has many competing pressures and conflicting interests. If elected, what would you prioritize and what would be your first action to address that idea?

Restoration of the waterfront seawalls. Expedite the separation of the Combined storm and sewer lines  in Vancouver and separate them sooner. Develop a Keep our Coasts Clean initiative to partner with local, provincial, federal agencies and organizations listed below and then roll out with schools to educate children and youth, to community centres to educate and recruit community, to Neighbourhood houses to help educate new families to Vancouver and Canada,

How would you build on the May 2017 Waterfront Motion to ensure the strongest possible waterfront planning for Vancouver’s future?

Hold those individuals and organizations accountable, identify the issues if not kept to the plan, highlight the perils and showcase what will be achieved. Use media and strong partners to collaborate and align with the cause. Ensure a strong process to further identify the features, benefits and value each partner brings to the table and with what timelines

If elected, would you help support a comprehensive waterfront plan?

Of course! Id love to be part of it

What’s your long-term vision for Vancouver’s waterfront?

To improve the water quality and improve freshwater stream flows. This will allow for inter-tidal restoration. We attempted to do inter-tidal plantings as part of restoration in Vancouver’s False Creek area, but the plantings mainly failed due to poor water quality. I was an active member of the Friends of False Creek Society, when we did water quality sampling and attempted ecological restoration.

Our waterfront has many competing pressures and conflicting interests. If elected, what would you prioritize and what would be your first action to address that idea?

Clearly water quality from both point-source (mainly sewer  outfalls) and non-point source (boats and some shoreline wastes) origins needs to be addressed. I would collaborate with City Council and other levels of government to work towards vastly improving this issue. Also, a public participation process, combined with a public education program would be started immediately.

How would you build on the May 2017 Waterfront Motion to ensure the strongest possible waterfront planning for Vancouver’s future?

By accelerating a swimming-safe, open-boating safe waterfront. We would form a task force to address the pressing issues, set out a participation process, and solve the most easily addressed issues. Clearly, we would have to work with City Council to speed up combined sewer separation, and with the boating community to limit waste from boats entering the shoreline water areas. Perhaps we could also explore some areas as possible federal marine protected areas.

If elected, would you help support a comprehensive waterfront plan?

Yes, I would not only support it, but would work to help coordinate it with Park Board staff and resources.

What’s your long-term vision for Vancouver’s waterfront?

I’d love to see a thriving board walk, that is community based and focused. I also want to start working towards ensuring our beachfront areas are protected against rising sea levels, and increased affects from a growing city (sewage dumps).

Our waterfront has many competing pressures and conflicting interests. If elected, what would you prioritize and what would be your first action to address that idea?

I believe a common goal needs to be established from the City, Park Board, Marinas, Port, and all other major local groups. I would like to a see a committee made from all levels that meets frequently to address issues, and ensure that all planning has the backing of everyone involved. Transparency is key, and ensuring that everyone is on board with the same goal helps foster a more dynamic and proactive environment.

How would you build on the May 2017 Waterfront Motion to ensure the strongest possible waterfront planning for Vancouver’s future?

This is a quote from our environment policy that the team put together. “YES Vancouver will improve the water quality and work to prevent beach closures by using the Development Cost Levies generated by our Let’s Fix Housing Action Plan to improve our infrastructure. YES will accelerate the rate of sewer separations in Vancouver, so raw sewage is no longer dumped into local waterways.” Additionally I want to see the Park Board communicating more frequently with boat owners to ensure that they don’t feel penalized, and their voices are heard when it comes to addressing waste disposal in False Creek.

If elected, would you help support a comprehensive waterfront plan?

YES

What’s your long-term vision for Vancouver’s waterfront?

A place accessible to all. Beaches that remain public & marinas that aren’t just for the wealthy,

Our waterfront has many competing pressures and conflicting interests. If elected, what would you prioritize and what would be your first action to address that idea?

Keeping public waterfront public. & not leasing it out to private interests.

How would you build on the May 2017 Waterfront Motion to ensure the strongest possible waterfront planning for Vancouver’s future?

Having not read the 2017 motion (I was busy reversing overdoses in the DTES), I would consult with the appropriate stakeholders.

If elected, would you help support a comprehensive waterfront plan?

Yes. I understand the need for a livable solution for those that live aboard boats. I used to live aboard myself & know the value of these communities. I also want our waterfront to be a place where the public can enjoy access & recreation.

What’s your long-term vision for Vancouver’s waterfront?

A robust sea of hotels stores and people

Our waterfront has many competing pressures and conflicting interests. If elected, what would you prioritize and what would be your first action to address that idea?

Id prioritize hotels to address the idea id put it to public hearing within my first six months as mayor.

How would you build on the May 2017 Waterfront Motion to ensure the strongest possible waterfront planning for Vancouver’s future?

I would ensure the May 2017 Waterfront Motion was before city hall and sign the declaration myself.

If elected, would you help support a comprehensive waterfront plan?

Yes

What’s your long-term vision for Vancouver’s waterfront?

Protection of the foreshore and ocean to ensure a lack of pollution

Our waterfront has many competing pressures and conflicting interests. If elected, what would you prioritize and what would be your first action to address that idea?

I would develop a foreshore management plan to ensure use consistent with the environment while allowing growth

How would you build on the May 2017 Waterfront Motion to ensure the strongest possible waterfront planning for Vancouver’s future?

I would ensure the Committee is as neutral as possible with a wide cross section of experts to assist.

If elected, would you help support a comprehensive waterfront plan?

Absolutely

What’s your long-term vision for Vancouver’s waterfront?

A sustainable waterfront that balances environmental stewardship with jobs; access to nature with responsible industrial use; livability (for all non-human residents too) with transportation and access.

Our waterfront has many competing pressures and conflicting interests. If elected, what would you prioritize and what would be your first action to address that idea?

A better, more transparent and collaborative relationship with Vancouver Fraser Port Authority to implement principles behind Vancouver Waterfront Initiative.

How would you build on the May 2017 Waterfront Motion to ensure the strongest possible waterfront planning for Vancouver’s future?

Binding MOUs and more collaboration with Port Metro Van, moving towards actual implementation of the Waterfront Initiative, not just aspirations. I would start by pushing back on the proposed Centerm expansion and attendant twinning of the Burrard Inlet (née BNSF) Line and need to manage at grade crossings for trains assembling in the Glen Yards. I see this opportunity to push back on transport of Port goods through the city as an opportunity to face Port Metro Van to the table and working together.

If elected, would you help support a comprehensive waterfront plan?

Yes.

What’s your long-term vision for Vancouver’s waterfront?

The waterfront needs to find a balance between livability for residents, and commercially sustainability. 

Our waterfront has many competing pressures and conflicting interests. If elected, what would you prioritize and what would be your first action to address that idea?

Keep waterfront accessible, clean, and enjoyable to all Vancouver residents, whilst maintaining the quality of life for residents, and for people working on the waterfront.

How would you build on the May 2017 Waterfront Motion to ensure the strongest possible waterfront planning for Vancouver’s future?

We believe that communities must have more input on policy decisions affecting people living in those communities.  Collaboration, accountability and transparency are core values of Coalition Vancouver.  So, that means getting stakeholders into the planning process, from the outset.

If elected, would you help support a comprehensive waterfront plan?

Yes, we believe in a comprehensive waterfront plan.

What’s your long-term vision for Vancouver’s waterfront?

Vancouver’s waterfront is an active, diverse place. There is room for industry and recreation. It is an important place for Indigenous coastal communities. The future planning for Vancouver’s waterfront must reflect all of these priorities.

Our waterfront has many competing pressures and conflicting interests. If elected, what would you prioritize and what would be your first action to address that idea?

In terms of the waterfront, I would continue to work within the city’s current plan for revitalizing and protecting our coastline. My first priority would be engaging Federal and Provincial governments to engage with the outcomes of this plan. I will also engage with the people of Vancouver to understand their priorities for our waterfront.

How would you build on the May 2017 Waterfront Motion to ensure the strongest possible waterfront planning for Vancouver’s future?

I would support the May 2017 Waterfront Motion. As a city, Vancouver must continue to protect and revitalize its waterfront. I will continue to engage all levels of government and First Nations on this issue. I will support motion with the goal of safe, healthy and accessible waterfront for Vancouver.

If elected, would you help support a comprehensive waterfront plan?

Yes

What’s your long-term vision for Vancouver’s waterfront?

I want to ensure that as much as possible of our waterfront remains pristine and natural, for the enjoyment of everyone.

Our waterfront has many competing pressures and conflicting interests. If elected, what would you prioritize and what would be your first action to address that idea?

Our port is important to Canada and the region. I would work with the Port to support returning as much of the waterfront under their control to a natural state as possible, and ensure that the remaining waterfront in our city is safeguarded for the public and remains protected and pristine.

How would you build on the May 2017 Waterfront Motion to ensure the strongest possible waterfront planning for Vancouver’s future?

I would focus our energy initially on cleaning up False Creek. We need to address outstanding issues related to water quality and run off in this area as a priority.

If elected, would you help support a comprehensive waterfront plan?

Yes I definitely would. We are a port city, and we need to address historical abuse of our waterfront and ensure that measures are taken to return them to a more natural state – for the benefit of all involved.

What’s your long-term vision for Vancouver’s waterfront?

Mixed use, combining industrial, residential, ecological and recreational uses.

Our waterfront has many competing pressures and conflicting interests. If elected, what would you prioritize and what would be your first action to address that idea?

Preservation of industrial land, while integrating ecological and recreational opportunities. At this time, no more waterfront need be given over to residential, except where the above items are not adversely impacted.

How would you build on the May 2017 Waterfront Motion to ensure the strongest possible waterfront planning for Vancouver’s future?

This is primarily a City Council responsibility, while I’m running for Park Board. So long as water quality isn’t impacted, and some consideration for access to the water for recreational purposes is included in the planning, those matters which reach Park Board and meet the above criteria will receive my support.

If elected, would you help support a comprehensive waterfront plan?

Cities always suffer most when there is no comprehensive planning. Too often we deal with the immediate situation with a very narrow focus. With all the competing waterfront interests, it would be foolish to approach the matter in a piecemeal fashion.

What’s your long-term vision for Vancouver’s waterfront?

My environmental platform calls for a variety of bold measures to ensure Vancouver continues to be a world leader in sustainability: accelerating Vancouver’s transition to renewable energy; stronger support for green buildings and retrofits for buildings that can resist rising sea-levels, etc. I am also resolutely opposed to the expansion of pipelines and other infrastructure for outdated fossil fuels.

I strongly support the development of a community plan for Vancouver waterfront. Among its elements, I would support a multilateral efforts — engaging other municipalities, industry and senior levels of government — in a significant expansion of efforts to restore streams and coastal areas: a Salmon Cities strategy.

Focussing on the recovery of salmon stocks, this would include urging Metro Vancouver to accelerate plans to separate storm sewers other sewage treatment systems, and a regional strategy to enhance the restoration and daylighting of select rivers and streams, allowing for the return of spawning salmon.

Better methods of capturing run off from rainwater would be an element of this. So, too, would be funding for Salmon Cities arts and culture, and opportunities to engage schools and local neighbourhoods in daylighting of select creeks and streams and protection/restoration/clean-up of sensitive intertidal ecosystems. This would ground the campaign, educating and engaging citizens as coast- and stream-keepers–giving them ownership of a bold strategy that appeals to Vancouverites of all backgrounds.

Our waterfront has many competing pressures and conflicting interests. If elected, what would you prioritize and what would be your first action to address that idea?

I would support the development of a community plan (with careful engagement of industries, small business and government) to provide a foundation for a balanced and inspiring strategy to protect Vancouver’s waterfront and coastal ecosystems. My platform envisages an environmentally and economically robust city economy. This calls for strong environmental protection, coupled with measures to boost public transit and densify in sensitive ways, so as to protect Vancouver’s critically important industrial areas and foster innovative sectors as well as the growth of small businesses city-wide.

How would you build on the May 2017 Waterfront Motion to ensure the strongest possible waterfront planning for Vancouver’s future?

No answer provided.

If elected, would you help support a comprehensive waterfront plan?

Yes.

What’s your long-term vision for Vancouver’s waterfront?

My vision for Vancouver’s waterfront is one that celebrates the intersection diversity of its residents (both human and non-human). Also a waterfront that is as prepared as possible for climate change over the next 50 years.

Our waterfront has many competing pressures and conflicting interests. If elected, what would you prioritize and what would be your first action to address that idea?

My priority for the waterfront will be preparation for the inevitable effects of climate change. There are number of community groups and politicians who are doing important work on the social experience of the area. My focus will be the effects of City of Vancouver on the shoreline, and starting the process of adapting to climate change such as sea level rise, storm surges, increased rainfall, etc.

How would you build on the May 2017 Waterfront Motion to ensure the strongest possible waterfront planning for Vancouver’s future?

1. Implement measures for increased supply, density, and access to affordable housing. Two areas of concern for Vancouver industries are the possible rezoning of industrial areas for residential, and the lack of housing available for potential tradespeople and other professionals who work on the waterfront. 2. Supporting a decrease in dependance on burning carbon through incentives for electric vehicles, transit ridership, and walk to work approach to housing. 3. Applying zero-waste strategies at the local level to decrease the amount of toxins that end up in the water and earth through municipal waste. Focus on the Reduce and Re-use approaches to municipal waste. Invest in public education programming to build zero-waste habits for residents of Vancouver, such as ‘pack-in-pack-out’ policies. 4. Supporting the physical and mental health of all residents of Vancouver to reduce toxins (such as pharmaceuticals) that are passed through people into the water stream. 5. Draw on knowledge from Indigenous, Eastern, and Western ways of healing and conservation.

If elected, would you help support a comprehensive waterfront plan?

Yes! The health of the Earth is one of my main agenda items when I am elected to city council.

What’s your long-term vision for Vancouver’s waterfront?

Vision Vancouver recognizes that the waters in and around Vancouver play an important role in the economic, ecological and social well-being of Vancouver. Vancouver City Council, under Vision’s leadership implemented a number of initiatives and policy frameworks to protect our waterfront and guide future planning for the long-term. Our vision is to have a waterfront that is resilient to climate change and rising sea levels; where people and goods move safely, efficiently and cleanly; where both industry and residents act to mitigate impacts on the land, air, water and wildlife; where people can recreate safely both in and out of the water; and where wildlife has access to safe places of refuge.

Our waterfront has many competing pressures and conflicting interests. If elected, what would you prioritize and what would be your first action to address that idea?

The Georgia Straight Alliance has noted that most successful waterfront initiatives globally have all been human-centred, people-first working waterfronts. What makes Vancouver’s waterfront special is that it still has stretches of relatively natural landscape that Vancouverites value highly – people flock to see the beauty of the Pacific Northwest, which contributes to the character of our waterfront and city. These are foundations for balancing the competing pressures we move forward with waterfront plans. A first step would be to dedicate a city planner to oversee all waterfront related issues. This person would establish themself as a coordinator and point of contact with other waterfront stakeholders, including the provincial and federal governments and the Port Authority. The second step would be to develop a comprehensive waterfront plan in consultation with these and other stakeholders. Part of this plan would address the issue of who takes the lead on matters of shared responsibility

How would you build on the May 2017 Waterfront Motion to ensure the strongest possible waterfront planning for Vancouver’s future?

This motion laid the groundwork and established the Waterfront Initiative focussed on three goals: 1. A Thriving Working Waterfront 2. Safe, Accessible Waterfront Recreation 3. Restoring Aquatic and Riparian Ecology and Traditional First Nations Food Sources. The three goals identified in the Waterfront Initiative motion provide a strong and balanced framework for future planning for Vancouver’s waterfront. These are 1. A Thriving Working Waterfront 2. Safe, Accessible Waterfront Recreation 3. Restoring Aquatic and Riparian Ecology and Traditional First Nations Food Sources. The work of the Georgia Straight Alliance and the Waterfront Initiative began in 2013, and to date has focused on relationship building and getting the right people to the table from across sectors. Now it’s time to review the findings and take the next steps forward. An important step towards building on these goals is to engage other waterfront municipalities in this work so that there is regional coordination and a regional plan to achieve shared success.

If elected, would you help support a comprehensive waterfront plan?

Vision Vancouver has been at the forefront of supporting the development of a comprehensive waterfront plan. We recognize that this work must engage First Nations, industry, senior levels of government and adjacent municipalities, and the community. Vision Vancouver will continue to provide leadership and support for creation of a comprehensive waterfront plan as a priority for the new City Council.

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